Confidence can be a bad thing – here’s why

Over confidence can undermine effort and lead to poor results

Published in: Work & performance

Confidence can be a bad thing – here’s why

By Stuart Beattie, Lecturer of Psychology, Bangor University, Tim Woodman, Professor and Head of the School of Sport, Health and Exercise Sciences, Bangor University
Originally published by The Conversation on June 23 2017.

The Conversation

The Conversation is an independent source of news and views, sourced from the academic and research community and delivered direct to the public.


Greater cultural diversity will enrich psychology

How parenting advice assumes you’re white and middle class

Diversity matters when it comes to making sure psychology research is widely applicable


Overtly sexy advertising can backfire

Don’t believe the hype: sexually-charged advertising is not the best way to push a product

The predominance of sexual imagery means it no longer has the same power to sell goods


What is traumatic brain injury?

There are significant challenges in navigating the emotional and behavioural difficulties associated with head injuries


Why you forget things you were sure you would remember

We are easily tricked into wrongly believing we will recall particular information

Published in: Work & performance

Why you forget things you were sure you would remember

By David J. Frank, Postdoctoral Scholar in Psychology, Case Western Reserve University, Beatrice Kuhlmann, Assistant Professor of Cognitive Psychology, University of Mannheim
Originally published by The Conversation on June 6 2017.

The Conversation

The Conversation is an independent source of news and views, sourced from the academic and research community and delivered direct to the public.


Nostalgia can be a source of strength

The psychological benefits – and trappings – of nostalgia

Reflecting on times past can help people cope with the present


Improving sleep in children with ADHD has some lessons for all parents

No shortcut: the importance of good habits and routine for ensuring kids sleep well


Working memory

How you keep things ‘in mind’ over the short term

Working memory is central to our functioning but it ebbs and flows over our lifespan


What science can reveal about the psychological profiles of terrorists

The complex factors that will help us understand radicalisation and violence


The science behind fidgetting

The surprising science of fidgeting

Children do it, but so do adults. Researchers have some theories on why we fidget

Published in: Health

The surprising science of fidgeting

By Harriet Dempsey-Jones, Postdoctoral Researcher in Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford
Originally published by The Conversation on May 24 2017.

The Conversation

The Conversation is an independent source of news and views, sourced from the academic and research community and delivered direct to the public.