Several psychological approaches may help address trolling

How empathy can make or break a troll

Singer-songwriter Ed Sheeran recently announced he had quit Twitter because he was sick of internet trolls. While this high-profile example shows the effects of antisocial online behaviour, it hides an alarming statistic. In one online poll over a quarter of Americans admitted to having engaged in trolling at some point. Now new research into the…


Parents may struggle to help teens stay engaged

How to maintain the balance between boundaries and freedom in secondary school parenting

How can parents best help their children with their schooling without actually doing it for them? 


Many prefer a previously attached partner - at least in theory

Why we desire partners who have had relationship experience

The strange science of mate copying


Fantasy sports are a new domain in gambling

What the rise of daily fantasy sports will mean for problem gambling

A seemingly harmless sports hobby may have the potential to spill over in destructive gambling problems


Confidence can be a bad thing – here’s why

Over confidence can undermine effort and lead to poor results

Published in: Work & performance

Confidence can be a bad thing – here’s why

By Stuart Beattie, Lecturer of Psychology, Bangor University, Tim Woodman, Professor and Head of the School of Sport, Health and Exercise Sciences, Bangor University
Originally published by The Conversation on June 23 2017.

The Conversation

The Conversation is an independent source of news and views, sourced from the academic and research community and delivered direct to the public.


Greater cultural diversity will enrich psychology

How parenting advice assumes you’re white and middle class

Diversity matters when it comes to making sure psychology research is widely applicable


Overtly sexy advertising can backfire

Don’t believe the hype: sexually-charged advertising is not the best way to push a product

The predominance of sexual imagery means it no longer has the same power to sell goods


What is traumatic brain injury?

There are significant challenges in navigating the emotional and behavioural difficulties associated with head injuries


Why you forget things you were sure you would remember

We are easily tricked into wrongly believing we will recall particular information

Published in: Work & performance

Why you forget things you were sure you would remember

By David J. Frank, Postdoctoral Scholar in Psychology, Case Western Reserve University, Beatrice Kuhlmann, Assistant Professor of Cognitive Psychology, University of Mannheim
Originally published by The Conversation on June 6 2017.

The Conversation

The Conversation is an independent source of news and views, sourced from the academic and research community and delivered direct to the public.


Nostalgia can be a source of strength

The psychological benefits – and trappings – of nostalgia

Reflecting on times past can help people cope with the present