There is no clear definition of what mindfulness is

What is mindfulness? Nobody really knows, and that’s a problem

The hype is ahead of the evidence when it comes to mindfulness and psychological problems


Suicide is a difficult but important topic to broach with your children

How to talk to your child about suicide

Stick with the simple truth when having this difficult but necessary conversation


Small changes can have big impacts on health. But should these changes be engineered?

Should you be ‘nudged’ into better health?

Giving consumers a subtle push towards healthy decisions is not without without ethical downsides

Published in: Health

Should you be ‘nudged’ into better health?

By Carissa Bonner, Research Fellow, University of Sydney, Ben Newell, Professor of Cognitive Psychology, UNSW
Originally published by The Conversation on October 3 2017.

The Conversation

The Conversation is an independent source of news and views, sourced from the academic and research community and delivered direct to the public.


Use of your phone can affect your attention in a number of ways

Five vital things you can’t do properly when you’re on your phone

In a recent RAC survey, 26% of UK 1,700 motorists reported using a handheld mobile phone while driving, despite it being illegal. In response, road safety charity Brake, argued that society’s phone “addiction” can have very serious consequences. A quick online search throws up many articles suggesting that people are “glued” to their smartphones and…


An understanding of psychology will help overcome barriers to evacuation

Psychology holds key to getting people out before disaster strikes

The risks of disasters is rising along with climate change. But there are many personal barriers to a timely and effective evacuation from danger

Published in: Society

Psychology holds key to getting people out before disaster strikes

By Elizabeth Newnham, Curtin Research Fellow in Psychology, Curtin University, Rex Pui-kin Lam, Clinical Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine, University of Hong Kong, Satchit Balsari, FXB Research Fellow, T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Harvard University
Originally published by The Conversation on October 12 2017.

The Conversation

The Conversation is an independent source of news and views, sourced from the academic and research community and delivered direct to the public.


Memories from our youth serve an important purpose

Why we remember our youth as one big hedonistic party

Our selective memories prioritise those exciting early memories

Published in: Health

Why we remember our youth as one big hedonistic party

By Amanda Barnier, Professor of Cognitive Science and Australian Research Council Future Fellow, Macquarie University, Celia Harris, Australian Research Council Discovery Early Career Research Fellow, Macquarie University
Originally published by The Conversation on September 5 2017.

The Conversation

The Conversation is an independent source of news and views, sourced from the academic and research community and delivered direct to the public.


Post Christmas lunch sleepiness can not be pinned on your choice of poultry

No, turkey doesn’t make you sleepy – but it may bring more trust to your table

What are the effects of tryptophan? Psychologists are investigating


Pleasure can be good for your health

What is hedonism and how does it affect your health?

Hedonists get a bad rap: psychology shows that taking pleasure can help your mental health


Are there benefits to the belief in Santa? Psychologists believe so

Lies about Santa? They could be good for your child

Fantastical beliefs in children are associated with positive developmental outcomes